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 Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow

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Jcbaran

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PostSubject: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:08 am

Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow
by Stephen Parker, Ph.D (Article Selection and Commentary) on January 26, 2011



The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.


Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

Filling the conscious mind with ideal conceptions is a characteristic of Western theosophy, but not the confrontation with the shadow and the world of darkness. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.

“The Philosophical Tree” (1945). In CW 13: Alchemical Studies. P.335

The change of character brought about by the uprush of collective forces is amazing. A gentle and reasonable being can be transformed into a maniac or a savage beast. One is always inclined to lay the blame on external circumstances, but nothing could explode in us if it had not been there. As a matter of fact, we are constantly living on the edge of a volcano, and there is, so far as we know, no way of protecting ourselves from a possible outburst that will destroy everybody within reach. It is certainly a good thing to preach reason and common sense, but what if you have a lunatic asylum for an audience or a crowd in a collective frenzy? There is not much difference between them because the madman and the mob are both moved by impersonal, overwhelming forces.

Psychology and Religion” (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.25

Whenever contents of the collective unconscious become activated, they have a disturbing effect on the conscious mind, and contusion ensues. If the activation is due to the collapse of the individual’s hopes and expectations, there is a danger that the collective unconscious may take the place of reality. This state would be pathological. If, on the other hand, the activation is the result of psychological processes in the unconscious of the people, the individual may feel threatened or at any rate disoriented, but the resultant state is not pathological, at least so far as the individual is concerned. Nevertheless, the mental state of the people as a whole might well be compared to a psychosis.

“The Psychological Foundation for the Belief in Spirits (1920). In CW 8: The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche. P.595

Unfortunately there can be no doubt that man is, on the whole, less good than he imagines himself or wants to be. Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual’s conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. If an inferiority is conscious, one always has a chance to correct it. Furthermore, it is constantly in contact with other interests, so that it is continually subjected to modifications. But if it is repressed and isolated from consciousness, it never gets corrected.

“Psychology and Religion” (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.131

We know that the wildest and most moving dramas are played not in the theatre but in the hearts of ordinary men and women who pass by without exciting attention, and who betray to the world nothing of the conflicts that rage within them except possibly by a nervous breakdown. What is so difficult for the layman to grasp is the fact that in most cases the patients themselves have no suspicion whatever of the internecine war raging in their unconscious. If we remember that there are many people who understand nothing at all about themselves, we shall be less surprised at the realization that there are also people who are utterly unaware of their actual conflicts.

“New Paths in Psychology” (1912). In CW 7: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology. P.425

It is a frightening thought that man also has a shadow side to him, consisting not just of little weaknesses- and foibles, but of a positively demonic dynamism. The individual seldom knows anything of this; to him, as an individual, it is incredible that he should ever in any circumstances go beyond himself. But let these harmless creatures form a mass, and there emerges a raging monster; and each individual is only one tiny cell in the monster’s body, so that for better or worse he must accompany it on its [banned term] rampages and even assist it to the utmost. Having a dark suspicion of these grim possibilities, man turns a blind eye to the shadow-side of human nature. Blindly he strives against the salutary dogma of original sin, which is yet so prodigiously true. Yes, he even hesitates to admit the conflict of which he is so painfully aware.

“On the Psychology of the Unconscious” (1912). In CW 7: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology. P.35

If you imagine someone who is brave enough to withdraw all his projections, then you get an individual who is conscious of a pretty thick shadow. Such a man has saddled himself with new problems and conflicts. He has become a serious problem to himself, as he is now unable to say that they do this or that, they are wrong, and they must be fought against… Such a man knows that whatever is wrong in the world is in himself, and if he only learns to deal with his own shadow he has done something real for the world. He has succeeded in shouldering at least an infinitesimal part of the gigantic, unsolved social problems of our day.

“Psychology and Religion” (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.140

Taking it in its deepest sense, the shadow is the invisible saurian tail that man still drags behind him. Carefully amputated, it becomes the healing serpent of the mysteries. Only monkeys parade with it.

The Integration of the Personality. (1939).

We carry our past with us, to wit, the primitive and inferior man with his desires and emotions, and it is only with an enormous effort that we can detach ourselves from this burden. If it comes to a neurosis, we invariably have to deal with a considerably intensified shadow. And if such a person wants to be cured it is necessary to find a way in which his conscious personality and his shadow can live together.

“Answer to Job” (1952). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.1

The world is as it ever has been, but our consciousness undergoes peculiar changes. First, in remote times (which can still be observed among primitives living today), the main body of psychic life was apparently in human and in nonhuman Objects: it was projected, as we should say now. Consciousness can hardly exist in a state of complete projection. At most it would be a heap of emotions. Through the withdrawal of projections, conscious knowledge slowly developed. Science, curiously enough, began with the discovery of astronomical laws, and hence with the withdrawal, so to speak, of the most distant projections. This was the first stage in the despiritualization of the world. One step followed another: already in antiquity the gods were withdrawn from mountains and rivers, from trees and animals. Modern science has subtilized its projections to an almost unrecognizable degree, but our ordinary life still swarms with them. You can find them spread out in the newspapers, in books, rumours, and ordinary social gossip. All gaps in our actual knowledge are still filled out with projections. We are still so sure we know what other people think or what their true character is.

“Psychology and Religion” (1938) In CW II: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P. 140

No, the demons are not banished; that is a difficult task that still lies ahead. Now that the angel of history has abandoned the Germans, the demons will seek a new victim. And that won’t be difficult. Every man who loses his shadow, every nation that falls into self-righteousness, is their prey…. We should not forget that exactly the same fatal tendency to collectivization is present in the victorious nations as in the Germans, that they can just as suddenly become a victim of the demonic powers.

“The Postwar Psychic Problems of the Germans” (1945)

To confront a person with his shadow is to show him his own light. Once one has experienced a few times what it is like to stand judgingly between the opposites, one begins to understand what is meant by the self. Anyone who perceives his shadow and his light simultaneously sees himself from two sides and thus gets in the middle.

“Good and Evil in Analytical Psychology” (1959). In CW 10. Civilization in Transition. P.872

A man who is unconscious of himself acts in a blind, instinctive way and is in addition fooled by all the illusions that arise when he sees everything that he is not conscious of in himself coming to meet him from outside as projections upon his neighbour.

“The Philosophical Tree” (1945). In CW 13: Alchemical Studies. P.335
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jack



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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:54 am

Interesting set of quotes.

I think meditation has potential to allow one to at least partially engage the shadow side without being overwhelmed or swindled by it. But it is only potentially true. I'm convinced some are better off being bound by mundane cultural norms which, except in moments of cultural madness, isolate them their own shadows. I'm not sure deep meditation is good for everyone.

I think perhaps the magic of cult leaders is the dim recognition that the shadow madness of the leader has deep kinship to the follower's own.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 11:43 am

Meditation can means so many different things, especially in this day and age.  In the Pali suttas, the Buddha taught 40 different meditation techniques.. and if you then add in all the various Mahayana, Tibetan, Zen and other practices, there are so many ways to meditate.  When I started out - and this is likely true for many of us in the early days of Zen in America, i mostly believed that meditation was so great it was the answer to every psychological and spiritual problem / dilemma / dis-ease.  Of course, that's just a belief, a mega-story - not based on reality / evidence.  It became clear over the years that meditation could be a very powerful practice - for some people - and not for others - and that it certainly was not "the answer" to everything.  I guess it all depends how you meditate, but does meditation help us face our shadows, shortcomings, fears, unconscious factors?  That's a big question and I would say that many western dharma teachers now feel that meditation is not the all purpose tool, but often people need therapy, counseling, and even medication.  Given the fact that so many "masters" clearly and woefully lack self-awareness and basic empathy, we can say with certainty that a strict adherence to the old ways does not lead to a this "full enlightenment" that is promised - at least for so many.  There may be some some rare exceptions.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:06 pm

having seen so many people obsessed with their karma and shadows , I think they are better off saying 'stuff it and big deal to all that commotion'

and having seen so many teachers pretending to be someone else and pretend they have not got any karma and shadows,i think they are better off packing in the day job and saying 'stuff it and big deal to their pretentious ways'

So my religious message for the day is 'stuff it and big deal
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 2:05 pm

Nicely put Michael.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 9:29 pm

Yes we all thought that meditation was the magic pill that would answer all our problems and cure all our ills. And indeed it is exactly this delusion that allows the Great Masters to con us (and often themselves). Meditation may lead us to better see the truth of things (note 'the truth' not 'The Truth') but there is no magic just mundane everyday life, wonderful. As Mike says of all the rest of the nonsense 'stuff it and big deal'.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 22, 2013 11:45 pm

I remember asking your friend Sochu Suzuki Roshi the address of a temple his reply

" Whole universe the address"
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jack



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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:22 am

Jung wrote:
Unfortunately there can be no doubt that man is, on the whole, less good than he imagines himself or wants to be. Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual’s conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. If an inferiority is conscious, one always has a chance to correct it.



Jung wrote:
Such a man knows that whatever is wrong in the world is in himself, and if he only learns to deal with his own shadow he has done something real for the world
Seems quite true to me -- in real life, and assuming Buddhism is real life, also Buddhist.

Josh wrote:
i mostly believed that meditation was so great it was the answer to every psychological and spiritual problem / dilemma / dis-ease.
I was basically taught the same thing, but also discovered it was not true for many, many people. The universality of religious claims is what creates both conflict and harm. It's not that they aren't true for some people -- they probably are, but they are not true for all people, and bludgeoning people  to enforce the claim is the very essence of the shadow side Jung wrote about.

Among the stories told here, Amalia's has remained one of the more troubling ones. It seems an exact fit for illustrating the harm of believing that meditation is the only and sufficient cure for all problems. In A's case, I remember her stating that meditation was liking stepping on the gas as she hurled toward breakdown. I've never had that reaction. So we are different. What's calming for me was destructive for her, and it was horribly destructive of her teacher to not even consider that people might be different. I think her teacher probably continued to feel holy, oblivious to his "shadow's" cruelty and the resultant pain.




Michael wrote:
having seen so many people obsessed with their karma and shadows , I think they are better off saying 'stuff it and big deal to all that commotion'
I'm not sure I'm reading what your wrote as intended. If you're saying the "shadow" is just "stuff and commotion," then we disagree. I personally have seen the shadow side of people wreck their lives and others -- people who honestly believed themselves to be "holy" while they ended up doing things that left them completely aghast at who they were -- even if they kept on doing it.

One need only look at the how easily the public is whipped to a "patriotic" frenzy that "justifies" a war that kills hundreds of thousands of innocents -- think Iraq if nothing comes to mind. While unleashing this convulsive violence, most feel themselves to be the most rational, civilized, and even godliest of people.

Or one can imagine a pious priest at an Inquisition torture session imploring God to have mercy on the soul he is wracking with pain.

The shadow is just "stuff?" Perhaps, but very painful and harmful "stuff."

A few days after 9/11, C., an African American friend of mine came to work with stories of his relatives in New York -- one of which had avoided tragedy by the luck of not going to work that day. People were happy his relative had not been involved. But to add some dramatic icing to his story, he told how his relatives in Harlem (I think it was Harlem) had gotten up a group of " brothers" who went to a Muslim shop to threaten the shopkeeper -- to let him know how angry they were, that he was being watched, that he'd be "dealt with" if there were any misstep. I don't know if they trashed the shop or not. As C. told it, they weren't going to let "them" get away with it.

As he passed from group to group, he retold the story to appreciative audiences, who sometime laughed encouraging assent. He finally came to my office as part of the tour. I said I'd heard his relative was OK. And then I said, (without being specific to his story), I'd been aghast at people assaulting and threatening Muslims just because of their ethnicity, that I had hoped all that sort of racist and ethnic targeting and intimidation was behind us, that I had hoped that the Jim Crow mentality was finally dead.

C. grew deathly quiet, and then agreed that he also hoped it was behind us. C. grew up with Jim Crow, a substrate of existential threat simply because he was black, intimidation, etc. I think he saw what he had been crowing about was the same dark stuff. To my knowledge, he didn't tell the story again.

C. was, is a nice guy -- just unaware that he could have the same primal instincts of tribe and race that he knew from experience in white folk.

The Buddhist story of Mahakala is usually seen as a Buddhist miracle story of sorts that illustrates the depth of Buddhist redemption possible, and the power of the Buddha. That's not too interesting to me. To me it works much better as a Buddhist allegory of the experience of courageously encountering our own horrible potential for evil, and taming it by encountering it, knowing it, living with it and transforming it.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Fri Aug 23, 2013 6:03 pm

I suppose we are entering into delicate areas, maybe areas of what actually,is a spiritual life, does one include or reject, ignore or be at one with this shadow.
Tn fact is meditation a bypass of a troubled life, is zen practice a straight jacket that one willingly wears to discipline ones self.
I think the answers really come from what our faith is, and where we feel our meditation leads us. I can not speak for anyone or any religion, but I am personally at home with believing that one cant practice meditation,it is just done, one can not dispel ones karma, but it can for a time at least fall away by itself. And we cant realize the truth as we have never been apart from anything anyway.
So is our shadow real and true? as much as anything else is, is it permanent and fixed for ever? as much a as anything else is. Can we be imprisoned by our own shadow, religious beliefs, spiritual practices? Do we carry our prison with us through life? well maybe we do, and can we laugh at our silly ways, and be one with the depth of who we are right now, I believe we can
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:27 am

Michael wrote:
So is our shadow real and true? as much as anything else is, is it permanent and fixed for ever? as much a as anything else is. Can we be imprisoned by our own shadow, religious beliefs, spiritual practices? Do we carry our prison with us through life? well maybe we do, and can we laugh at our silly ways, and be one with the depth of who we are right now.
There's that perspective also. It is, as you say, quite possible to get stuck in our views.


In the morning I look East and see the sunrise. In the evening I look West and see the sunset. At night I look up and see a bright starry sky that wasn't there during the day. Are any of these the "true" view? 'What a ridiculous question!', you'd likely think.

So it is with shadows, karma, Zen meditation, kensho, etc.  They are all very useful metaphors about reality and all very insane as the only explanation of the way things are,
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:01 am

I think there are many explanations about the way things are. Personally I don't want someone else's explanation no more than I want my own. From what we have touched on and discussed here over the last few years Zen seems littered with personal explanations, so much so that cults form, and some become good and some bad, the big teachers  seem persuasive with their points of view, their own actions bear no relation to their teaching and rather than help people find their own heart, direction, and maturity, have hindered personal growth and coloured other peoples lives with the colours of their own stagnant colours of their own shadows. I believe that when we all innocently looked into zen and meditation we wanted freedom truth peace and good direction, a good teacher may help here, but what we are looking for can not be found in cults, sects, foreign countries and certainly not from the shadows or non shadows of anyone else
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:48 am

Ahhhhhhhh  .Thank you , Michael ...Chisan ( which one do i choose ? i can barely remember who you are ) .
 i love your clarity ,and its nearly always liberating , gives me courage .
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:58 pm

Nicky wrote:
Ahhhhhhhh  .Thank you , Michael ...Chisan ( which one do i choose ? i can barely remember who you are ) .
 i love your clarity ,and its nearly always liberating , gives me courage .
+1
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:10 pm

glorfindel 
why are you  just repeating what ive written ? 
And what does that little +1 mean ? 
i feel a bit uneasy .
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Wed Aug 28, 2013 1:18 pm

Don't worry nicky! The +1 is Internet parlance for "I agree"! It's kind of like "+1 to the number of people that agree with this point."

Sometimes a whole thread can be just people saying "+1"! 

So, basically, I totally shared your sentiment.

Smile
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Wed Aug 28, 2013 3:14 pm

Kind words like
The sound of the sea
So pleasant to hear
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Wed Aug 28, 2013 5:42 pm

Interesting lab that is studying meditation: 

http://www.brittonlab.com/
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Wed Aug 28, 2013 7:48 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 29, 2013 6:38 am

Glorfindel , thanks and, +1 and  now i know .

So sorry - must have anyway been in  an uneasy mood .
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:13 am

Michael wrote:
I think there are many explanations about the way things are. Personally I don't want someone else's explanation no more than I want my own.
I hold explanations lightly -- for what they are -- rather than being a complete or adequate description of reality. I freely admit that I have eyes, a human mind that works the way it does, and that actual reality is probably quite beyond the human mind . There is a great and joyful dance in this lightness of being that has nothing whatsoever to do gouging my eyes out so I can do the Zenny thing of pretending to transcend the opposites or be without views. Letting go of the Zenny pretense was a load-lightening discard of that stone in my backpack.

Freedom comes from both seeing and being Just be what you are without really believing any of the roles you assume or the masks you wear, let alone fighting with others because of some imagined ultimate importance of those.

Lightness of being is so much richer than blindness.

That said, I don't quarrel with what you wrote. My own reaction, I suppose. is not so much to what you wrote, but to the "stink of Zen" as it too claims to be the ultimate "viewless" view.

This is today's view. Tomorrow's may be different. Nothing permanent. Nothing to hang onto.

I've enjoyed the scenery of your views on this topic.
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Fri Aug 30, 2013 3:49 pm

I have to say in response to the real view of, north, south, east, and west, that we moved our Zendo for our weekly get together. We usually meet at my house and sit in my small zendo, but two weeks ago we went onto the cliffs and found a hidden part where there is a small area below what looks like the edge of the cliff.  When sitting  there is nothing between us the sky and the sunset. We had our weekly zazen, blue sea, blue changing sky, seagulls gliding in the thermals, the incredible vastness, individually so small, personal concerns , thoughts and daydreams, so important, yet so insignificant.
 
The old man I met in Japan was a stickler for doing it the right way, Dogen's way, the way of  hundreds of years ago, this is how you sleep, how you wash, how you stand,, Maybe completely irrelevant to living today, maybe the old man had something to teach or maybe it was possible to learn something from this peculiar way of exact living, yes I remember him well I remember how my knees hurt, how my feet were too big for their special sandals, and would blister,, I am not so sure what I learnt from the old man but I do always know when my effort is not enough, when I loose sight of right way to do things, when my heart remains closed, and I forget the gentle way of the Buddha.
 
When a Japanese girl died nearby I was asked to perform a ceremony, it was important, because the family had seen me at the old mans temple, so I asked him exactly what he wanted me to do, his words resonate like a temple drum, after years of precise living, and influence of centuries old practice, he told me it did not matter, do a ceremony from your heart.
 
It is very easy to drop Buddhism, and to forget about zen, but if one does not live from one's heart,  life will never be right,this as difficult as it may be to live up to, may well be what I learnt from the little old man, The true way is the way of ones heart.
 
 
 
Ah the zendo cliffs of Cornwall
This peculiar stink of zen which
Permeates the Universe
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PostSubject: Re: Carl Jung: Thirteen Quotations on the Shadow   Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:38 pm

Michael wrote:
It is very easy to drop Buddhism, and to forget about zen, but if one does not live from one's heart,  life will never be right,this as difficult as it may be to live up to, may well be what I learnt from the little old man, The true way is the way of ones heart.
Ahhh (like a cool drink of water), yes!
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